Soapstone

Soapstone is a natural quarried stone. It's a metamorphic rock that is called soapstone because of the soft, or soapy, feel of its surface, which is thanks to the presence of talc in the stone. Most American soapstone is sourced from the Appalachian mountain range, or imported from Brazil and Finland. There are two varieties: artistic and architectural that are differentiated by talc contact. Artistic-grade soapstone has a high talc content and is soft and easy to carve. Architectural-grade soapstone has a lower talc content (usually between 50% and 75%), which makes it harder—and more suitable for countertop use. It's not as hard as granite or marble, however, and can be easily cut, shaped, and installed. Unlike granite and marble, however, it's typically quarried in smaller slabs, meaning that for counters longer than 7 feet, several pieces (and visible seams) are necessary.

Low maintenance is the name of the game with soapstone. Soapstone's nonporous quality makes it bacteria resistant, so harsh cleaners are not needed. Simple soap and water cleaning is all that's recommended.

If there is one maintenance issue with soapstone, it may be its softness and susceptibility to scratches and nicks. You can protect the surface by using cutting boards. And the good news is that user-caused imperfections generally can be removed, as mentioned above, with a quick sandpaper buffing. No professional repairs required.

Soapstone can be applied in the following places:
Because of its resilience and adaptability, soapstone can be used for much more than countertops; it works well as sinks, fireplace surrounds (thanks to its heat resistance), flooring, and throughout the bathroom. It's also a great choice for outdoor counters and sinks as it's impervious to weather and bacteria.